Three Acts, Two Dancers, One Radio Host

 

Movement Description for Three Acts, Two Dancers, One Radio Host

Through the red velvet curtains of a small stage frame, two female dancers surge out and burst with high performative energy. They both wear black skirts, sneakers, and a red flower pinned on their white tops. Facing the audience and standing side by side, they start their jazzy phrase with bouncing in second position while their fists revolve in front of them. They quickly shift their weight backward and clap to launch their traveling motion. They bounce, leap, quick ball change, flick their legs and arms in high extension and at times to opposite directions from their facings, yet maintain clear balletic and jazz lines. They keep their focus outward and presentational, at times gesturing towards the audience. The phrase is continuous and exhausting. Remaining side by side, the dancers perform in unison. The phrase repeats four more times, during which Ira Glass challenges the roles of theatrical spectatorship, by referring to the dancers by their real first names, Monica and Anna. Therefore, breaking the 4th wall. He comments on what the dancers are doing or going through by saying, for instance, “we sometimes repeat something so much that it starts to mean nothing” and “we see their effort.” When Glass comments on Bill Barnes and Bass and communicates to the audience about them, the dancers begin to appear [as themselves and] more like ordinary people instead of dramatic characters with extraordinary abilities. Hence, their distant relationship with the audience breaks even though their movements remain essentially presentational. 

 

 

Cover Photo by http://3acts2dancers1radiohost.com

 

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